Arkansas Historic Preservation Program
Batesville Confederate Monument
Batesville Confederate Monument
Historic photograph of the Batesville Confederate Monument
Historic photograph of the Batesville Confederate Monument

BATESVILLE CONFEDERATE MONUMENT, BATESVILLE, INDEPENDENCE COUNTY

SUMMARY

The Batesville Confederate Monument is associated with the historic context "Something So Dim It Must Be Holy”:  Civil War Commemorative Sculpture in Arkansas, 1886-1934 as a commemorative monument financed and erected through the efforts of both a descendants' and a veterans’ organization in Arkansas.  As such, it is eligible under Criterion A with statewide significance for its associations with the efforts of the Sidney Johnston Camp No. 235 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Sidney Johnston Camp No. 863 of the United Confederate Veterans to reflect members' perceptions of the noble character and valor of the veterans and their cause.  Thus, it also meets the eligibility requirements of Criteria Consideration F:  Commemorative Properties.

ELABORATION

In July 1906 the Sidney Johnston Camp No. 135 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Sidney Johnston Camp No. 863 of the United Confederate Veterans, both located in Batesville, decided to erect a monument to the Confederate soldiers and women of Independence County.  By August 31 of that year a contract for the design and building of the monument had been signed with Otto Pfeiffer's marble quarry in nearby Pfeiffer, Arkansas.  The project was completed and its cost of $831.40, which included grading and cleaning around it, was paid for in January 1907.

The Batesville Confederate Monument was dedicated at the county courthouse on May 1, 1907.  The featured orators for the occasion were Sen. James H. Berry, commander of the Arkansas Division of the U.C.V., and Gen. Robert G. Shaver, who commanded two Arkansas Confederate regiments during the Civil War.  The U.D.C.’s book Confederate Monuments and Markers in Arkansas described it as an "impressive ceremony,” and stated that “[the monument] has a massive appearance with dignity and grace, symbolizing the cause.”  The night before the unveiling, a ceremony had been held in honor of Sen. Berry featuring "Confederate flags decorated in profusion."

The Batesville Confederate Monument is associated with the historic context "Something So Dim It Must Be Holy”:  Civil War Commemorative Sculpture in Arkansas, 1886-1934 as a commemorative monument financed and erected through the efforts of both a descendants’ and a veterans' organization in Arkansas.  As such, it is eligible under Criterion A with statewide significance for its associations with the efforts of the Sidney Johnston Camp No. 135 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Sidney Johnston Camp No. 863 of the United Confederate Veterans to reflect members' perceptions of the noble character and valor of the veterans and their cause.  Thus, it also meets the eligibility requirements of Criteria Consideration F:  Commemorative Properties.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Arkansas Gazette, May 16, 1911, p. 10.

Letter dated November 20, 1992, from Anna Parks to Toni Davidson, included in SOS! survey files on file at the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.

"Confederate Monuments and Markers in Arkansas," Arkansas Division U.D.C., 1960, pp. 9-11.