Sandwiching In History

The “Sandwiching in History” tour series features a historic property in central Arkansas each month. All tours are held on Fridays at noon and last no more than one hour. The tours are organized by the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage. An AHPP historian delivers a brief lecture about the property before leading guests on a tour. Attendees are encouraged to bring their lunches with them. All tours are free and open to the public. View the videos of past Sandwiching in History tours at the Arkansas Preservation YouTube channel.

Sandwiching in History Schedule                                                

  • October 6: Gustave Kleinschmidt House
  • November 3: Pulaski County Courthouse
  • December 1: Little Rock City Hall

 

View Archived Sandwiching in History Tour Scripts


Pulaski County Courthouse/November 3, 2017

Details

Please join us for the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program’s eleventh “Sandwiching in History” tour of 2017, where we will visit the Pulaski County Courthouse at 401 West Markham Street in Little Rock beginning at noon on Friday, November 3.

The Pulaski County Courthouse, located at 405 Markham Street, is in the heart of downtown Little Rock (Pulaski County). Two distinct buildings make up the Pulaski County Courthouse: a Romanesque Revival completed in 1889 and a Beaux Arts structure completed in 1914. The styles are divergent from each other and symbolize different eras in Little Rock’s history. The 1889 building was the first permanent courthouse in the county and was meant to demonstrate Arkansas’s growing prominence. Little Rock and Pulaski County were growing, and the new courthouse represented that progress. The Arkansas Historic Preservation Program recognizes that part of the courthouse as architecturally and historically significant, confirming the statement made in an 1887 edition of the Arkansas Gazette that the courthouse was “designed to be the most imposing structure of the kind” in Arkansas. In the 1914 courthouse, twelve statues representing different segments of Arkansas life such as agriculture, machinery, justice, and art stand in the large central hall. The statues, along with cartouches along the balustrade near the roofline, were designed by an Italian sculptor named Giusto Liva and his sons, Paul and John. The statues are supported by pedestals and marble columns that rise up to a two-story rotunda. A bust of Count Casimir Pulaski sits in the middle of the rotunda underneath an impressive stained-glass dome. It was added to the National Register on October 18, 1979.

Directions/Map


Little Rock City Hall/December 1, 2017

Details

Please join us for the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program’s final “Sandwiching in History” tour of 2017, where we will visit Little Rock City Hall at 500 West Markham Street in Little Rock beginning at noon on Friday, December 1.

Little Rock City Hall was designed by noted architect Charles L. Thompson and has been the seat of government for the capital city since 1908. Work on the new city hall started on November 4, 1906, and a grand-opening celebration for the three-story building featuring decorative stone was held on April 15, 1908. Children ran up and down the marble staircase, which was one of the few original adornments of the neoclassical design. From 1929 to 1942, the third floor of the building was home to the Museum of Natural Science and Antiquities, precursor to the Museum of Discovery. In the 1960s, the exterior was significantly changed when many of the outside walls were cemented in order for a new air-conditioner unit to be installed, along with other modernizations. A connecting fire station is located just to the west of the main structure. It was added to the National Register on November 18, 1979.

Directions/Map