Sandwiching In History

The “Sandwiching in History” tour series features a historic property in central Arkansas each month. All tours are held on Fridays at noon and last no more than one hour. The tours are organized by the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage. An AHPP historian delivers a brief lecture about the property before leading guests on a tour. Attendees are encouraged to bring their lunches with them. All tours are free and open to the public. View the videos of past Sandwiching in History tours at the Arkansas Preservation YouTube channel.

Sandwiching in History Schedule                                                

  • December 1: Little Rock City Hall
  • January 5: First United Methodist Church, 723 Center Street, Little Rock. 
  • February 2: Markham Street United Methodist (Faith United Methodist Church), 9820 W. Markham, Little Rock. 
  • March 2: Block Realty-Couch House, 8 Armistead Road,Little Rock 
  • April 6: Dr. Charles H. Kennedy House, 6 Edenwood Lane, North Little Rock. 
  • May 4: Lake Nixon, 18500 Cooper Orbit Road, Little Rock. 
  • June 1: Maumelle Ordnance Works Bunker #4, 4 Willastein Drive, Maumelle. 
  • July 6: William E. Woodruff House, 1017 East Eighth Street, Little Rock. 
  • August 3: National Old Line Building, 501 Woodlane Street, Little Rock. 
  • September 7: Matthews-Storey House, 8115 Ascension Road, Little Rock. 
  • October 5: Rock Island Argenta Depot, 1201 East Fourth Street, North Little Rock. 
  • November 2: Mary H. Matthews Lustron House, 5021 Maryland Avenue, Little Rock. 
  • December 7: Curran Hall, 615 East Capitol Avenue, Little Rock.

 

View Archived Sandwiching in History Tour Scripts


First United Methodist Church/January 5, 2018

Details

First United Methodist Church, 723 Center Street, Little Rock. Designed by noted Little Rock architect Frank Gibb in 1896, the First United Methodist Church is his only known commission in the Romanesque Revival style. The congregation of the First United Methodist Church was organized in 1831, making it the oldest Methodist Church in Little Rock. From 1868 to 1914 at least five other Methodist churches were established as “missions” of First Methodist, earning it the title of “Mother Church.”

Directions/Map


Markham Street United Methodist Church/February 2, 2018

Details

Markham Street United Methodist Church (Faith United Methodist Church), 9820 W. Markham, Little Rock. Nestled in among scores of ranch houses sits the former Markham Street United Methodist Church. Designed by the Little Rock firm of Cowling & Roark, the church was constructed in 1966 and sat on the western edge of the city. The church stands as one of the most unique Frank Lloyd Wright inspired churches in the city. It features design elements taken from Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Prairie Style architecture and his little known American System-Built “prefab” designs. Join us as we explore the history and architecture of this fantastic Mid-Century Modern gem.

Directions/Map


Block Realty-Couch House/March 2, 2018

Details

Block Realty-Couch House, 8 Armistead Road, Little Rock. The Block Realty-Couch House was built ca. 1950 and started as a spec. house by Block Realty. During the house’s construction, it was purchased by the Harvey C. Couch, Jr., family, which had the house finished. In 1953, the Couch Family hired Little Rock landscape architect Neil Hamill Park to design and landscape the side patio for the family. Today, the house is a good mid-century example of the Colonial Revival style and is representative of the large gracious homes in its Heights neighborhood.

Directions/Map


Dr. Charles H. Kennedy House/April 6, 2018

Details

Dr. Charles H. Kennedy House, 6 Edenwood Lane, North Little Rock. Join us for a look at one of the most unusual Mid-Century Modern homes in Central Arkansas, the Dr. Charles H. Kennedy Residence. Designed by Arkansas Modernist and early University of Arkansas Architecture Program graduate, Warren Segraves, the Kennedy Residence stands out as a unique design not only for the Little Rock/North Little Rock area but also within the resume of work by Segraves. Warren Segraves designed some of the most iconic and well-known Mid-Century Modern buildings in Northwest Arkansas, including the former Fayetteville Public Library, the former Swepco Office Building, and Unitarian Fellowship Hall. The Charles Kennedy Residence was completed in 1964 and one of only four designs by Segraves to be constructed in Central Arkansas. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in September of 2017 for being an exemplary example of Mid-Century Modern residential design.

Directions/Map


Lake Nixon/May 4, 2018

Details

Lake Nixon, 18500 Cooper Orbit Road, Little Rock. Lake Nixon is associated with a national-level desegregation case, decided by the United States Supreme Court in 1969, that set the precedent barring discrimination at entertainment and recreation establishments, which were found to be subject to Title II of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. The continued fight over desegregation at Lake Nixon continued to show how civil rights were being infringed upon in the Little Rock area, even after landmark decisions like the integration of Little Rock Central High School in 1957.

Directions/Map


Maumelle Ordnance Works Bunker #4/June 1, 2018

Details

Maumelle Ordnance Works Bunker #4, 4 Willastein Drive, Maumelle. Maumelle Ordnance Works Bunker #4 was one of 21 bunkers constructed in Maumelle as part of the Maumelle Ordnance Works built between 1941 and 1942. The bunkers were built for production of picric acid and ammonium picrate for use during World War II. In 1945 production of picric acid and ammonium picrate ceased and the plant was slated for decontamination. In subsequent years all but three of the twenty-one bunkers have been destroyed.

Directions/Map


William E. Woodruff House/July 6, 2018

Details

William E. Woodruff House, 1017 East Eighth Street, Little Rock. William E. Woodruff, founder and longtime editor of the Arkansas Gazette, and his wife, Jane Eliza Woodruff, had eleven children, eight of whom survived to adulthood. In the spring of 1852 Woodruff sought an area in the country where he could have a small farm and his children could play, so he bought about 25 acres east of downtown. He hired local builder John Robins to construct a large house of locally-made bricks. The family occupied the house from 1886-1891, when the home was sold out of the family. By 1930 the Woodruff House was the Colonial Club for Business Girls, and it remained a boarding house or apartments until 2005, when the house sustained fire damage. It has been vacant since then. At the end of 2014, the Quapaw Quarter Association purchased the property with aid from the State of Arkansas and the City of Little Rock. The QQA is seeking a buyer with the interest and capacity to rehabilitate the landmark.

Directions/Map


National Old Line Building/August 3, 2018

Details

National Old Line Building, 501 Woodlane Street, Little Rock. Join us to explore the remarkable history and design of the National Old Line Insurance Building. This building is regarded as the largest and best example of International-style architecture in the state of Arkansas. Designed by local architect Yandell Johnson, the National Old Line Insurance Building was built in 1955 with an addition in 1965. The history of the building is one of controversy and notoriety. Once home to Arkansas’s former governor, Winthrop Rockefeller, the National Old Line Insurance Building stands as an icon of Modern architecture in the capital city.

Directions/Map


Matthews-Storey House/September 7, 2018

Details

September 7: Matthews-Storey House, 8115 Ascension Road, Little Rock. The Matthews-Storey House , constructed in c. 1925, is an amazingly intact example of a Craftsman Style airplane bungalow in Central Arkansas built by the Justin Matthews Company in the Westwood development of Little Rock. The airplane bungalow is a rare form of residence designed in the Craftsman Style and named due to the similarity of its form, small upper story and cross gables, that echoes the cockpit and wings of 1920s aircraft. The Matthews-Story House was a rental property for several years, before being purchased by the Storey family in 1934. The house eventually was owned by a succession of families, including a Christian Science Practitioner, an insurance salesman, and a Baptist pastor. The house continues to be a single family residence and includes many original features and fixtures.

Directions/Map


Rock Island Argenta Depot/October 5, 2018

Details

Rock Island Argenta Depot, 1201 East Fourth Street, North Little Rock. The Rock Island Argenta Depot is a single-story brick passenger depot constructed in 1913 and designed in the Mediterranean style common to the contemporaneous depots of the Rock Island Railroad Company. It has a simple Latin-cross plan with the telegrapher's bay and corresponding cargo room on the street elevation forming the transept.

Directions/Map


Mary H. Matthews Lustron Home/November 2, 2018

Details

Mary H. Matthews Lustron House, 5021 Maryland Avenue, Little Rock. The Matthews House is a rare example of a Lustron House in Arkansas. Built ca. 1949, the house is constructed entirely out of porcelain-enameled steel panels, and is one of only a handful of this prefabricated house type that remains in the state, and one of two known examples that remain in Little Rock. Lustron houses were prefabricated in Columbus, Ohio, and represented an attempt to manufacture housing that could be cheaply and quickly constructed for veterans returning from World War II.

Directions/Map


Curran Hall/December 7, 2018

Details

Curran Hall, 615 East Capitol Avenue, Little Rock. Curran Hall is a great example of Greek Revival architecture and is one of few antebellum houses that survive in Little Rock. Construction began in late 1842. Mary Woodruff Bell (daughter of the Arkansas Gazette’s founder William E. Woodruff) purchased Curran Hall in 1884 and it remained in the Bell family until the last descendant, Avrill Tate moved out in 1993. The City of Little Rock and the Little Rock Advertising and Promotion Commission purchased the property and with the assistance of the Little Rock Visitor Information Center Foundation restored the property and converted it into the Little Rock Visitor Information Center. It was opened on May 18, 2002.

Directions/Map