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Sandwiching in History Tour Set for Old NLR Fire Station

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Friday, February 17, 2017

LITTLE ROCK–The Arkansas Historic Preservation Program’s next “Sandwiching in History” tour will visit the Old Central Fire Station at 506 Main Street in North Little Rock on Friday, March 3, AHPP Interim Director Marian Boyd announced today.

The Old Central Fire Station is a two-story brick building, with a three-bay front facade dominated by a large equipment bay on the ground floor, now enclosed by glass doors. The building, whose construction date is not known, was acquired by the city in 1904, shortly after its incorporation, and initially housed city offices, the jail and the fire station. In 1914 the town offices were moved to North Little Rock City Hall, and in 1923 the building's original two equipment bays were replaced by one. The horse stalls were also removed, as the new equipment was powered by gasoline engines. The building served as the city's main fire station until 1961. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 22, 1977, and currently houses the North Little Rock History Commission.

The “Sandwiching in History” tour series targets Pulaski County structures and sites. The noontime series includes a brief lecture and tour of the subject property. The American Institute of Architects offers one HSW continuing education learning unit credit for members who attend a “Sandwiching in History” tour.

Other 2017 “Sandwiching in History” tours will be held April 7, Dibrell House, 1400 Spring Street, Little Rock; May 5, Arkansas Ordnance Plant Guard House (Jacksonville Museum of Military History), 100 Veterans Circle, Jacksonville; June 2, Carmelite Convent and Chapel, 7201 W. 33rd Street, Little Rock; July 7, Albert Pike Hotel, 701 Scott Street, Little Rock; August 4, Acme Brick, 301 South Victory Street, Little Rock; September 1, Park Hill Fire Station and Water Company Complex, 3417-3421 Magnolia Street, North Little Rock; October 6, Gustave Kleinschmidt House, 621 East 16th Street, Little Rock; November 3, Pulaski County Courthouse, 401 West Markham Street, Little Rock, and December 1, Little Rock City Hall, 500 West Markham Street, Little Rock.

All tours are free and open to the public. For information, call the AHPP at (501) 324-9880, write the agency at 1100 North Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, send an e-mail message to [email protected], or visit www.arkansaspreservation.org.

The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.

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Dr. Patrick House Listed on National Register of Historic Places

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Thursday, February 16, 2017

LITTLE ROCK—The Dr. James Patrick House at Fayetteville in Washington County has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the country’s official list of historically significant properties, Arkansas Historic Preservation Program Interim Director Marian Boyd announced today.

The Dr. James Patrick House at 370 North Williams Drive is a Mid-Century Modern-style building constructed in 1965 from a design by architect Ernie Jacks.

“The design of the Dr. James Patrick House also reflects the increased relationship between the indoors and outdoors, as well as the issue of privacy in house design,” according to the National Register nomination. “The design of the Patrick House, with its sliding glass doors opening onto the rear terraces, and large windows along the terrace façades, encouraged residents and visitors to interact with the house’s surroundings. The placement of the large windows away from the street also emphasized privacy for the house’s occupants from the street.”

The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.

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Preserve Arkansas Seeks 'Most-Endangered' Nominations

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Little Rock—Preserve Arkansas, the state’s non-profit historic preservation organization, requests the public’s help in identifying endangered historic places for the 2017 Most Endangered Places List.

The Most Endangered Places list highlights historically and architecturally significant properties throughout the state that are worthy of preservation. Preserve Arkansas is soliciting nominations from residents and organizations across Arkansas of buildings, structures, sites, and other places to be considered for inclusion in the list. The nomination deadline is Friday, March 17, 2017.

The Most Endangered Places program began in 1999 to raise awareness of the importance of historic properties to the state's heritage. The sites reflect threats such as deterioration, neglect, insufficient funds, insensitive public policy, and inappropriate development. Preserve Arkansas will compile the 2017 list of Arkansas’s Most Endangered Places by soliciting nominations from the public, and the list will be announced in May during Arkansas Heritage Month and National Preservation Month.

Previous listings include the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home in Dyess, the William E. Woodruff House in Little Rock, Arkansas Mound Sites throughout the state, the White River Bridge in Clarendon, the Thompson Building in Hot Springs, African-American Rosenwald Schools, and Historic County Courthouses throughout the state.

Criteria considered for inclusion in the list of Arkansas’s Most Endangered Places includes the degree of a property's local, state, or national significance; a property's eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places, and the imminence and degree of the threat to the property.

The public is invited to participate in the Most Endangered Places program by nominating properties to Preserve Arkansas’s 2017 list. Nomination information and program guidelines may be found at www.PreserveArkansas.org. The property nomination information, photographs, and support materials may be submitted via an online form or email. For more information, call 501-372-4757 or email [email protected].

Preserve Arkansas works to build stronger communities by reconnecting Arkansans to our heritage and empowering people to save and rehabilitate historic places. For more information about Preserve Arkansas or to become a member, contact Rachel Silva at 501-372-4757, [email protected], or visit www.preservearkansas.org.

 

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AHPP Among Preserve Arkansas Award Winners

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Friday, February 10, 2017

Little Rock - On January 27, 2017, Preserve Arkansas hosted its annual Arkansas Preservation Awards dinner and program to honor individuals and organizations for projects focused on historic preservation, education, and advocacy throughout the state.

 

2016 Arkansas Preservation Award Recipients

 

The Parker Westbrook Award for Lifetime Achievement was given to Cheryl Griffith Nichols. Cheri Nichols’s name is synonymous with historic preservation in central Arkansas and beyond. From her commitment to the Quapaw Quarter Association to her service with the Historic Preservation Alliance of Arkansas (now Preserve Arkansas), as well as her roles with Preservation Action and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Cheri has been an advocate, a practitioner, a fundraiser, a political ally, a mentor, and a force in the evolving discipline of historic preservation in the United States.

 

The Excellence in Heritage Preservation Award was presented to the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program for the National Historic Preservation Act 50th Anniversary Celebration. To celebrate this important anniversary, the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program developed a National Register poster series and passport program.

 

Awards for Excellence in Preservation through Rehabilitation were given to the following projects:

 

* Residential Project—123 S. Schiller Street, Little Rock. Once vacant and boarded, the house at 123 S. Schiller Street was rehabilitated to serve as two apartments in the Capitol View Historic District. Third Floor Partners, LLC, Johnson Consulting, LLC, and Earl Langston Construction were recognized with the award.

* Public Project—City of Fayetteville for the Maple St. and Lafayette St. Bridges, Fayetteville. This project rehabilitated two National Register-listed bridges constructed in the 1930s to span the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway between downtown Fayetteville and the University of Arkansas campus. The City of Fayetteville, McClelland Consulting Engineers, and Crossland Heavy Contractors were recognized with the award.

* Commercial Project—Friedman-Mincer Building (Texas Corner Project), Fort Smith. Located at the prominent intersection of Garrison and Towson Avenues in downtown Fort Smith, the 1912 Friedman-Mincer Building was rehabilitated to house the offices of Propak Logistics. Propak Logistics, deMx Architecture, and Carrington Creek Holdings were recognized with the award.

 

The Award for Excellence in Preservation through Restoration was given to the Bradley County Courthouse in Warren. With the help of two County Courthouse Restoration Grants from the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, the project team stabilized the building’s foundation and repaired extensive damage to masonry walls, windows, and interior spaces. Bradley County, Arkansas, Hon. Klay McKinney and Hon. Keith Neely (2009-2016), WD&D Architects, and Ideal Construction were recognized with the award.

 

The award for Outstanding New Construction in a Historic Setting was given to the Dyess Welcome Center and Gift Shop at the Historic Dyess Colony, an Arkansas State University Heritage Site. By the time the 1948 Dyess Theatre property was donated to Arkansas State University, only the façade and projector room remained. The façade was restored, and a new building was constructed behind it to serve as a community center, visitor center, and gift shop. The Arkansas State University Heritage Sites Program, Allison + Partners, Inc., and Bailey Contractors, Inc., were recognized with the award.

 

The award for Outstanding Achievement in Preservation Education went to the City of Fayetteville for the Fayetteville Square Virtual Marker Program. The Fayetteville Convention and Visitors Bureau and Coover Consultants, LLC, created a high-tech, yet inexpensive, virtual web-based tour of the Historic Fayetteville Square utilizing QR codes on buildings to link to text and historic photos for each of the 31 stops on the tour.

 

The award for Outstanding Work by a Craftsman was given to John Amos of Amos Millworks for the Cane Hill College window restoration at Canehill, Washington County. Amos carefully reproduced the building’s original triple and double-hung windows and paneled doors.

 

The award for Outstanding Preservation Reporting in the Media was given to Arkansas Life/WEHCO Company for the “Work in Progress” series, which painted an accurate picture of the forces that impact the preservation of historic places in Little Rock and around the state.

 

Honorees and guests celebrated with a reception and banquet at the Albert Pike Memorial Temple in Little Rock, followed by a program recognizing the award-winning projects. Pete Hartman of KUAF-FM served as Master of Ceremonies for the event.

 

The Awards slideshow and photos from the 2016 Arkansas Preservation Awards are available at http://preservearkansas.org/what-we-do/arkansas-preservation-awards/.

 

Preserve Arkansas works to build stronger communities by reconnecting Arkansans to our heritage and empowering people to save and rehabilitate historic places. For more information about Preserve Arkansas or questions about the Arkansas Preservation Awards, contact Rachel Silva Patton at 501-372-4757, [email protected], or visit www.PreserveArkansas.org.

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Six Properties Listed on National Register of Historic Places

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Friday, February 10, 2017

LITTLE ROCK—Six Arkansas properties have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the country’s official list of historically significant properties, Arkansas Historic Preservation Program Interim Director Marian Boyd announced today.

The newly listed properties are:

* Aristocrat Motor Inn at Hot Springs in Garland County, a Mid-Century Modern-style building constructed in 1963. “The Aristocrat Motor Inn was designed as a six story V-shaped tower over a larger rectilinear first story,” according to the National Register nomination. “The inner courtyard is defined by the saw-toothed sides of the tower, with the street side left open. The inner saw-toothed sides allowed for a large amount of light into each of the rooms. This is especially important due to the fact that the only windows for most of the rooms are located along the inner edge of the courtyard. The south and north facades do not include window openings. The overall design of the hotel, with its wide “V” shape, white wall planes, large glass panels, and use of large neon-lighted signs, is also reminiscent of earlier Googie style structures.”

 

 

 

* The Lake Catherine State Park Prisoner of War Structures in Hot Spring County, including a stone retaining wall and barbecue pit built by German POWs in 1945. “The Lake Catherine State Park Prisoner of War Structures are one of the last surviving remnants of the former Hot Springs Prisoner of War branch camp, and stand as a proud reminder of the significant role Hot Springs– and Arkansas – played in supporting the United States during WWII,” according to the National Register nomination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Minaret Manor at Osceola in Mississippi County, built in 1948 and reflecting the Tudor Revival and Collegiate Gothic styles of architecture. “The beautiful Minaret Manor has been the centerpiece for lavish living, entertainment and extravagant court drama in the Arkansas Delta City of Osceola between 1948 and 1968,” according to the National Register nomination. “The Minaret Manor exemplifies a myriad of architectural styles including the Tudor Revival and Late Gothic Revival traditions within Mississippi County. It is not the only house in the area to have Tudor Revival detailing, but it is the finest and most grand example of an American’s interpretation of architectural styles found in England during this time period.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Brinkley Concrete Streets at Brinkley in Monroe County. “The remaining concrete streets are a reminder of the efforts of Brinkley in the early twentieth century to provide infrastructure for the city’s residents and they also illustrate the efforts to provide infrastructure for the increased automobile traffic that was developing in the early 1900s. Even today, almost a century later, the Brinkley Concrete Streets provide an important role in transportation in Brinkley, continuing to serve the residents as they did in the 1920s.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* First Evangelical Lutheran Church at Fort Smith in Sebastian County, a Gothic Revival-style building designed by W. H. Blakely and Hoffman, architects, and constructed between 1900 and 1904. “The design of the church includes many of the typical Gothic Revival characteristics, including the use of heavy, substantial materials such as stone, steeply pitched cross gables, pointed arch windows, detailed ornamentation, and wall surfaces that extend in the gable ends without a break,” according to the National Register nomination. “All of the buildings known to be associated with William H. Blakely in Fort Smith have been either substantially changed, such as the Fort Smith Carnegie Library, or have been completely demolished. The First Evangelical Lutheran Church is the only known surviving structure that still retains its historic integrity.”

 

 

 

 

* St. John’s Episcopal Church at Camden in Ouachita County, a 1926 building designed in the Gothic Revival style of architecture by the architectural firm of Witt, Siebert & Halsey of Texarkana. “St. John’s Episcopal Church is an excellent example of a brick Gothic Revival style church in Camden,” according to the National Register nomination. “The design of the church includes many of the typical Gothic Revival characteristics, including the use of a heavy, substantial material such as the deep red brick, steeply-pitched gable roofs, pointed-arch windows, detailed ornamentation and polychrome design, and wall surfaces that extend in the gable ends without a break. Also, all of the windows in the church include exaggerated lintels and pointed arches as well as surbased arches, all with extended sills.”

For more information on the National Register of Historic Places program, write the AHPP at 1100 North Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, call the agency at (501) 324-9880 [TDD 501-324-9811], send e-mail to [email protected] or visit www.arkansaspreservation.org.

The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.

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AHPP Historian to Present Hot Springs Lecture

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Thursday, February 09, 2017

LITTLE ROCK–The Arkansas Historic Preservation Program will present a program titled “Rest, Relaxation, and Rehabilitation: Military Style” to the Ouachita Chapter of the Arkansas Archeological Society at 7 p.m. Tuesday, February 14, at the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences, and the Arts at 200 Whittington Avenue in Hot Springs, AHPP Interim Director Marion Boyd announced today.

The free lecture by Survey Historian Travis Ratermann will discuss the history of the Army and Navy Hospital’s use of two sites near Hot Springs for recreational use of hospital staff and convalescents. The presentation is open to the public.

For more information on the free lecture, contact Sherri Bradbury at [email protected].

The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.

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Mowdy to Manage Jacob Wolf House

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Tuesday, February 07, 2017

LITTLE ROCK–The Arkansas Historic Preservation Program has hired Marlon Mowdy to develop the Jacob Wolf House Historic Site in Norfork, AHPP Interim Director Marian Boyd announced today.

Mowdy will be responsible for planning and developing management and interpretation at the Jacob Wolfe House, a ca.1825 building that served as the original Izard County Courthouse.

“I’m very excited that Marlon Mowdy is joining the AHPP and helping to develop the Wolf House as a heritage tourism destination,” Department of Arkansas Heritage Director Stacy Hurst said. “We look forward to welcoming visitors to Arkansas’s oldest courthouse later this year.”

Mowdy, who holds a master’s degree in heritage studies and public history from Arkansas State University, is a nineteen-year resource management veteran of Arkansas State Parks, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, having served as superintendent and ranger at museums, parks and wildlife refuges.

The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.

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Main Street Designer to Present Mid-Century Architecture Lecture

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Friday, February 03, 2017

LITTLE ROCK–Mason Toms, preservation service and design coordinator for Main Street Arkansas, will present a program on mid-century architecture to the Pulaski County Historical Society on Sunday, February 12, AHPP Interim Director Marian Boyd announced today.

 

 

Toms will present “John Toland: The Pioneer of the Concrete Block Frontier”at 2 p.m. at the Darragh Center of the Central Arkansas Library System’s Main Library at 100 Rock Street in Little Rock. Toland was a major developer in North Little Rock’s Levy and Amboy neighborhoods and was noteworthy for his use in concrete blocks in his residential structure.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information, contact [email protected].

Main Street Arkansas is a program of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.


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AHPP Schedules February Cemetery Lectures

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Tuesday, January 31, 2017

LITTLE ROCK–The Arkansas Historic Preservation Program will present gravestone iconography lectures in Perryville and Fort Smith during February.

AHPP Special Projects Historian Holly Hope will present the free lecture – “Flora, Fauna and Faces: Reading Cemetery Symbolism”:

* At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, February 14, at the Max Milam Library at 609 Aplin Street in Perryville, sponsored by the Perry County Historical and Genealogical Society. For more information contact Hope at (501) 324-9148 or [email protected], or call Buford Suffridge at (501) 690-4333 or (501) 771-1012.

* At 7 p.m. on Thursday, February 16, in the Echols Conference Center at 504 North Waldron Road on the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith campus, sponsored by the Ark-Homa Chapter. For more information, contact Hope at (501) 324-9148 or [email protected], or Tim Mulvihill at (479) 788-7812 or [email protected].

The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.

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Main Street Arkansas investments top $15 million

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program - Friday, January 27, 2017

LITTLE ROCK—Main Street Arkansas cities recorded $15,398,746 in investments in downtown projects in 2016, Main Street Arkansas Director Greg Phillips announced today. Main Street Arkansas is a program area of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.

“Investments in the historic commercial cores of our Main Street Arkansas towns show a renewed commitment to historic preservation around the state,” Department of Arkansas Heritage Director Stacy Hurst noted. “Not only do these projects restore some of our finest historic buildings, they also help create jobs in small towns all over Arkansas.”

Main Street Arkansas cities in 2016 noted 126 façade renovations, building rehabilitations and new downtown construction projects, reflecting investments of $15,398,746. The cities documented a net gain of 34 businesses and 40 business expansions and relocations into downtown areas, creating a net gain of 195 jobs. In addition, there were 33 public improvement projects generated in Main Street Arkansas cities, reflecting $17,737,601 invested in the historic commercial areas. Main Street cities also recorded 13,346 volunteer hours invested in downtown.

Since its inception in 1984, Main Street Arkansas cities have yielded a net gain of 6,413 jobs, a net gain of 1,291 new businesses and 1,194 business expansions and relocations into downtown. A total of $172,156,514 in investment has financed 2,311 façade renovations, rehabilitations and new construction projects. The Main Street cities have seen 958 public improvement projects valued at $42,697,918 and 605,655 volunteer hours on Main Street matters.

Cities currently involved in Main Street Arkansas are Batesville, Blytheville, Conway, Dumas, El Dorado, Eureka Springs, Helena-West Helena, Jonesboro, Downtown Little Rock Partnership, Little Rock’s South Main Street (SoMa), Osceola, Ozark, Paragould, Rogers, Russellville, Searcy, Siloam Springs, Texarkana and West Memphis. Members of Main Street’s Arkansas Downtown Network are Hardy, Pine Bluff, Heber Springs, Fort Smith, Morrilton, Rector, Monticello, Arkadelphia, Clarksville, Warren, Wynne, Fayetteville, Forrest City, Malvern, Pocahontas, Newport and Paris. Other sponsors of the Main Street Arkansas program are Preserve Arkansas and the Arkansas Economic Development Commission. To learn more about Main Street Arkansas, visit http://www.arkansaspreservation.com/main-street/.

The Arkansas Historic Preservation Program is the agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage responsible for the identification, evaluation, registration and preservation of the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies in the department are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Old State House Museum, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Historic Arkansas Museum and the Arkansas State Archives.

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